Author Topic: What are your favourite sample sources?  (Read 97 times)

AfternoonWalk

What are your favourite sample sources?
« on: November 24, 2018, 12:05:51 PM »
Hello everyone! This is my first time trying to start a conversation in Agora Road's Macintosh Cafe, and I'm interested to know what kind of music do you like to work with while doing sample based material.

Me personally, I mostly like to sample Japanese music in general (mostly J-Pop). Sometimes I pick songs from anime related projects or even go through an artist involved's discography to find interesting material. My EP "Forever In My Heart" is a good example of my experimentation with these kinds of music. I'll leave it here if you feel curious:

 

There have been times where I just go through my computer looking for music that sounds good enough to start working with, and lately, I've been thinking about songs from my childhood to download to add that nostalgic value to my future works.

What about you? What do you like to sample, and what's the process do you go through while choosing or searching for samples?

Have a nice day!


Enjoy your walk!

Eis-T

Re: What are your favourite sample sources?
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2018, 01:10:57 PM »
Yes! Samples are such an integral part to vaporwave and I think we should have a conversation about them. There are two answers I'd like to give you, a personal and a cultural.
First the personal, I was born in 88 and I come to Vaporwave from a nonstalgic perspective. There are these hazy memories of growing up in the 90's I just can't shake. audio back then had such a distinctively digital /DX7 sound to it. I don't find new samples, I rediscover what I might have heard back then. Ideas for where to look often come to me when I'm not making music (on the bike, when I wake up, in the shower, etc). Another source I use heavily is a CD collection I've built up over the years by visiting flea markets and record shop clearance sales.
Secondly the cultural: among many, many things Vaporwave is a plunderphonic music genre (you'll not gonna get a definition of Vaporwave out of me, I don't believe it is possible to pin down the art movement that is vaporwave into a single definition). This means that samples are at the heart of the genre. Or put more bluntly: Vaporwave is built upon a pile of stolen shit. Conceptually this makes perfect sense as the whole concept of property didn't really apply to music in the era Vaporwave is alluding to. Vaporwave continues in the mindset of napster, bootleg cassette's and those twilight CD-ROMs with pirated software your cousin lended to you. When I hear Lisafrank420, I not only hear Diana Ross, I hear Vektroid re-appropriating her own culture in the most post-modern way. What is music other than ideas translated to a bunch of soundwaves? No wonder most vaporwave artists use a pay-as-you-feel model on bandcamp. Music should be available for all as you are entitled to it just as much as anyone else does.
This brings me to the future of vaporwave: as an art movement with distinctive marxist and anti-modernist messages (often expressed as satirical through the over-glorification of late capitalism) we often become what we try to critique. The whole collectors culture of limited cassette runs and special vinyl releases has become a serious business instead of an overly (and openly) ironic one. I think it is in this context we need to discuss the fact that our man with an impeccable taste in samples, 猫 シ Corp. has decided to stop using samples in his productions from now on. I am very conflicted on this. On one hand he is the great innovator of the genre and has successfully explored the many directions in which vaporwave can be taken, but on the other I fear this is taking away something essential without artistic justification. I don't believe that not using samples makes you more of a "Real Artist" or that giving in to the cultural fencing of the copyright lobby is the responsible thing to do as a leader in the vaporwave community.
 
"Thank you for choosing Eis-T as your personal refreshment today"

AfternoonWalk

Re: What are your favourite sample sources?
« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2018, 05:50:48 PM »
Yes! Samples are such an integral part to vaporwave and I think we should have a conversation about them. There are two answers I'd like to give you, a personal and a cultural.
First the personal, I was born in 88 and I come to Vaporwave from a nonstalgic perspective. There are these hazy memories of growing up in the 90's I just can't shake. audio back then had such a distinctively digital /DX7 sound to it. I don't find new samples, I rediscover what I might have heard back then. Ideas for where to look often come to me when I'm not making music (on the bike, when I wake up, in the shower, etc). Another source I use heavily is a CD collection I've built up over the years by visiting flea markets and record shop clearance sales.
Secondly the cultural: among many, many things Vaporwave is a plunderphonic music genre (you'll not gonna get a definition of Vaporwave out of me, I don't believe it is possible to pin down the art movement that is vaporwave into a single definition). This means that samples are at the heart of the genre. Or put more bluntly: Vaporwave is built upon a pile of stolen shit. Conceptually this makes perfect sense as the whole concept of property didn't really apply to music in the era Vaporwave is alluding to. Vaporwave continues in the mindset of napster, bootleg cassette's and those twilight CD-ROMs with pirated software your cousin lended to you. When I hear Lisafrank420, I not only hear Diana Ross, I hear Vektroid re-appropriating her own culture in the most post-modern way. What is music other than ideas translated to a bunch of soundwaves? No wonder most vaporwave artists use a pay-as-you-feel model on bandcamp. Music should be available for all as you are entitled to it just as much as anyone else does.
This brings me to the future of vaporwave: as an art movement with distinctive marxist and anti-modernist messages (often expressed as satirical through the over-glorification of late capitalism) we often become what we try to critique. The whole collectors culture of limited cassette runs and special vinyl releases has become a serious business instead of an overly (and openly) ironic one. I think it is in this context we need to discuss the fact that our man with an impeccable taste in samples, 猫 シ Corp. has decided to stop using samples in his productions from now on. I am very conflicted on this. On one hand he is the great innovator of the genre and has successfully explored the many directions in which vaporwave can be taken, but on the other I fear this is taking away something essential without artistic justification. I don't believe that not using samples makes you more of a "Real Artist" or that giving in to the cultural fencing of the copyright lobby is the responsible thing to do as a leader in the vaporwave community.

I do also have a big collection of CDs that I check out sometimes to see if there's anything interesting to play with.

Also, I agree that the movement is becoming something different to what it used to be. I personally think that it is because of the desire of doing the music that you love while you can still get it safely and effectively out there, which leads to the use of more respectful techniques towards copyrights and also preferring not to go under an anonymous persona (which it is a different subject, but I thought it was a relevant thing to point out).

This was a very interesting response, so thank you so much for stopping by!
Enjoy your walk!

Pi_Rol

Re: What are your favourite sample sources?
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2018, 08:28:08 PM »
During the period of time I used the moniker of Pi_ROL I had a tendency of using old advertisements and whenever possible tried to recreate the vibe of a Telereceptor going off in the background. I planned to continue using this medium more but due to poor archiving and lack of available material I had to abandon the style in favour of using video game music samples. Everything I have made since the summer of 2017 has had some relevance of video-game tie-in, most of the samples are from games between 1995-2002 because of how poppy and pumped the music is as it borrows from the best the time had to offer [as well as the nostalgia I identify the most because arcades were ((and still are)) my shit].