Author Topic: Let's make a Course Outline  (Read 272 times)

Offline Eis-T

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Let's make a Course Outline
« on: September 16, 2019, 08:54:19 AM »
If we are serious about starting a MOOC [Massive Open Online Course], I think one of the first things we need to make is a course outline.
I think the first step is to make an inventory here with topics/focus points/perspectives that we think are interesting and relevant. The second step is making a logical progression of topics and themes to tie it all together in a cohesive learning experience.

So, what do you think should be covered in a MOOC on Vaporwave?


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Offline Eis-T

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Re: Let's make a Course Outline
« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2019, 10:12:19 AM »
Let me kick off the list with two things I'd like to include:

- A detailed timeline with key moments in the development of the genre. With this I not only mean essential releases but also influential think-pieces like Harper's and the emergence of various sub-genres. I think it would be helpful to divide vaporwave's history in different era's, though I'm wary of the dangers of oversimplification by strictly labeling time.
- A Venn Diagram/flow chart of Vaporwave's many subgenres. An overview would really help to both show the immense diversity exiting in vaporwave, but also highlight the interconnectedness of these microgenres within vaporwave. A sublime example of such a map is made by Metal enthusiasts for their genre: https://mapofmetal.com
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Re: Let's make a Course Outline
« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2019, 07:15:32 AM »
Last week I realized that we'll have to cover what is probably the most contentious topics in Vaporwave in our course. Since the beginning there hasn't been any consensus, let alone clarity on how to answer the most basic question: "what is vaporwave". Everyone has their own explanation and uses a their own definition. After I gave it some thought I think we'll have to address this in our approach / course outline.
- starting the course with an in-depth "what is vaporwave" doesn't make much sense. It'll come across as hair-spitting and the students won't be familiar with the concepts (aesthetics, hauntology, past futures, unreliable narrator, etc).
- ending the course with a "so what is vaporwave?" is equally undesireable. as it feels like we've been avoiding the core subject for the entire duration of the course before coming to the point.
I suggest we divide the explanation of vaporwave into the separate topics and refrain from providing a cast-in-stone definition of Vaporwave. It makes more sense to for example have one lecture about vaporwave as an experience, then another one of vaporwave as a critique on capitalism, then vaporwave as an online community, and then another one of vaporwave as an aesthetic.
This change in course setup makes it the task of the students to connect the dots between the different lectures and approaches. This is basically what they in sociology call "reflexivity": It  makes the course not only about providing "facts and knowledge", but also providing the tools to understand vaporwave as a living culture in which the student can become an actor(participant).
Also, if we really want to provide a challenge to them, we can make them write an essay about what Vaporwave is from their perspective :) .
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